22 Harden Lane, Bradford BD15 0EU :: Registered Charity No. 1136858 :: Registered Company No. 7008298

Blog Posts

£600 raised at benefit concert

Music-lovers from the Bradford area raised £600 at a benefit concert for the Margaret Carey Foundation. The Steeton Male Voice Choir headlined the concert which also featured Luke Jackson and the Manchester Airport Choir.

The 80-voice Steeton Male Voice Choir recently won the Leeds “Choirs Rock” competition, and last year performed at both the Rugby League World Cup Final at Elland Road and at the World Club Championship at Headingly.  They performed a mixed programme of traditional, classical and modern music.

Luke Jackson was described by Mike Harding as “a great singer, a great songwriter, and a really commanding presence.” Nominated for both the BBC Young Folk Award and the Horizon Award for Best Emerging Talent, Luke has just released his new album, More Than Boys, to outstanding reviews.

TV audiences saw the transformation of 30 baggage handlers, air traffic controllers, fire service and security staff from Manchester Airport into a polished choir under the direction of Gareth Malone in the BBC series, Sing While You Work.

 

Prisoners help Ugandan youngsters

More than 100 bikes restored by prisoners at HMP Liverpool and HMP Everthorpe have been donated to an orphanage, a primary school, a hospital and a hospice in Uganda, thanks to our partners at BeCycling Africa.The bikes were originally donated by individuals in the Bradford area of West Yorkshire and by Rotary Clubs across the country and taken by us to our workshops at the prisons.

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Garth Prison Inmates and MCF Help Get Tonynanook Mobile Again

Disabled Lancashire pensioner Tonynanook Kulurachi has had her life transformed after we were able to present her with a wheelchair handbike to replace her old mobility scooter. Tonynanook contacted us when her scooter broke down, leaving her house-bound at her home in Warrington.

Fortunately we had just the thing she needed, thanks to our Garth Prison workshop in Leyland. The handbike was just one of a number of cycles and wheel chairs donated to us each year that are refurbished through our prison engineering workshops schemes.

While a lot of the cycles and wheel chairs we refurbish are sent around the world it was great on this occasion to be able to help someone in the local community.

 

 

HMP Liverpool workers speak out

Our project officer, Katy McCormick, visited our bike project in Workshop 6 at HMP Liverpool (Walton) to award Bronze, Silver and Gold Certificates of Achievement to some of the trainees. These certificates are given when the men reach a certain level of skill, and are also our way of saying thank you for their work. Many of these men have never received a certificate or any kind of acknowledgement before, and it can mean a lot to their self-esteem. She gave a short presentation about the bikes we had recently sent to Bulgaria and listened to some of them men talk about their experience of the workshop. Here is her report:”A really important part of the project is that the men understand what happens to the bikes they repair. I showed them pictures and talked to them about the bikes we sent to Baba Tonka House in Bulgaria.  Bulgaria has the highest number of abandoned children of any country in the EU and these children are kept in huge, state-run institutions with little personal attention or care. Baba Tonka House offers an alternative, supporting disabled children and their families to reduce abandonment. The bikes were an unheard-of treat for the children, and a really useful means of transport for the staff.

I then had a chance to talk to some of the men, asking them about what they liked about the workshop and if they thought they were learning anything that would be useful when they were released.

The feedback about the bikes to Bulgaria made a big impact. “Not being funny but some of the lads had a tear in their eye.” “Makes you think that does. Those kids over there.” “It’s good that you came to talk to us.”

They all agreed they had improved their mechanical skills and some thought it might be useful in the future. “I’ll be able to fix the kiddies’ bikes.” “I wonder how I could set up a project like this when I get out.”

The calm atmosphere in the workshop was a plus. “Every other place I’ve been here I’ve been thrown out. Just my temper. Can’t help it really. But I don’t get stressed here.” “It’s just a good mood in here. Calm.”

The men said that in other workshops each man tends to his own work. Here, they are more likely to work together or help one another out. “Sure, I’ll show him [if he needs help].”

As I left, it seemed to me that the bicycles were almost a by-product. What they are really making in Workshop 6 is self-esteem.

Bulgaria has the highest rate of abandoned children in the European Union. This disabled boy is so happy with his new bicycle – thanks to the men in Workshop 6, HMP Liverpool.

From a Lancashire jail to war-torn Sri Lanka

We connect prisoners to people in need all over the world. Watch the short video below – Wheelchairs from Lancashire –  to see how wheelchairs restored by prisoners at Garth Prison in Lancashire have helped land mine victims in Sri Lanka — and given children in Chennai, India, mobility and independence. And please do share with friends and colleagues. Thanks!

 

 

Garden party guests give £500

Thank you to everyone who came to our annual fundraiser at David and Susan’s house in Wilsden, Bradford. The sun shone, the band sounded great, and together you raised £500 to help us keep our new van on the road. The money will cover the costs of road tax and will make a contribution to the insurance costs. The van is out two to three days a week every week, collecting materials from donors around the country, delivering to prison workshops, picking up the restored goods from prisons and delivering them to the various charities that distribute them overseas.

Susan and David put in a tremendous amount of work to make the party a success (although David can only claim partial credit for the good weather!) and we will try something new next year to give them a bit of a rest. Do please get in touch if you have any ideas or would like to host an event at your house, club or society.

If you didn’t get to the party, you can still donate: just click here <a href=”http://www.justgiving.com/margaretcarey/donate/?utm_source=website&utm_medium=buttons&utm_content=margaretcarey&utm_campaign=Donate_JG_Blue_Large”><img src=”http://www.justgiving.com/charities/content/images/logo-buttons/blue/Donate_JG_Blue_Large.gif” alt=”Donate JustGiving” /></a>

Could you guide our organisation as we grow and develop?

Trustees wanted:

Margaret Carey Foundation has grown hugely since our charity was registered less than two years ago. New staffing, new funding, and new projects have put us in a strong position to develop new restorative justice projects, generate new income streams, and deliver support for new communities.

We now seek to expand our Board of Trustees in order to ensure that we have the appropriate strategic skills, range of expertise, new ideas and sufficient trustee personnel to support our CEO and staff team effectively during the next stage of MCF’s development.

Becoming a trustee offers the opportunity to use your enthusiasm, initiative, passion and experience to make a real difference in people’s lives. It’s a chance to develop your skills and play a key role in steering the organisation over the coming years.

Our trustees are unsalaried and meet for Board Meetings for approximately 2 hours every two months, currently in the Bradford, West Yorkshire area, on or about the second Monday morning of the month. Travel expenses can be re-claimed, in line with our policy. Cake and refreshments are provided.

As the majority of MCF correspondence and communication is undertaken by email or is internet / web based, it is essential for all trustees to have computer access. We remind all interested applicants that they will not be eligible to become trustees if they are legally disqualified for being so in any way.

Information on how to apply, a full job description and person specification can be downloaded as a pdf here: Trustee pack

Or email katy@margaretcareyfoundation.org.uk


Meet the Partners

MCF is a small charity of six, part-time staff. Yet we have more than a dozen projects covering a large area of northern England and the Midlands. How do we do it? With a network of strong partnerships supporting everything we do. We’d like to introduce you to just a few of the organisations which support us with collecting recycled bikes or donating refurbished ones, and explain how we’re maximising our impact by working together.

Introducing: PhysioNet

Young people in Uganda get mobiliy and dignity thanks to PhysioNet and Margaret Carey Foundation

PhysioNet is a charity based in Yorkshire, set up in 2005 to provide physiotherapy equipment to disabled children and adults in Eastern & Central Europe and in developing countries around the world. They are completely volunteer-run, with no paid staff. They send four to six containers overseas each year, funded by individual donations and small grants. Physionet also organise responsive donations, such as to the Spinal Injuries Assocation for delivery to Fiji in the aftermath of the 2016 cyclone.

Prince William talking to Bhutanese boys who received rollators from the 2015 shipment.
Prince William talking to Bhutanese boys who received rollators from the 2015 shipment.

PhysioNet collect donated physio equipment, including wheelchairs, from all over the country, but some of them need repairs before they can safely be reused by people in need. That’s where MCF comes in: any wheelchairs that need refurbishing or repair go to our expert workshop at HMP Garth before going back to PhysioNet and being loaded onto the containers.

The equipment helps children and adults far and wide achieve a quality of life not previously accessible to them, with equipment which would otherwise have ended up in the UK waste system. This year, PhysioNet sent containers to Ukraine, Fiji, Sri Lanka, Ghana, Romania and Bulgaria . Physionet is run by volunteers who have relevant expert knowledge, and partnes with charities in the host country, to ensure the right equipment goes to those most in need. One such example is Malamulele, a charity working with children with Cerebral Palsy in disadvantaged areas of Southern Africa which regularly receives items of physiotherapy equipment and wheelchairs in Saxonwold, Johannesburg, South Africa.

The chief executive of PhysioNet is David Kaye. For more information about Physionet, visit their website www.physionet.org.uk

 

Wheelchairs distributed in Uganda thanks to PhysioNet

Bradford residents donate bikes to Ugandan orphans

More than 50 people brought their old bikes to Margaret Carey Foundation’s recent bike drive in Bradford. Many were lucky enough to get a new bike for Christmas and were happy to donate their old one. Others were just glad to clear out their sheds and garages. All the bikes will be cleaned and restored by offenders in prison workshops, and then sent overseas to help an orphanage in Uganda.

Margaret Carey Foundation’s chief executive, David Brown, said: “Not many children in Africa will have had a new bike this Christmas.  We’re delighted by the generosity of all the people here in Bradford who have played “Santa” to these kids.  These bikes also give meaningful work to offenders in prisons across the North of England. They work hard to fix up the bikes so they are just about good as new, before we hand them over to the charity that will get them overseas in the Spring.”

That charity is BeCycling for Africa, led by Chris Armstrong of West Yorkshire. Chris has raised money for shipping the bikes and has formed links with the Uganda National Cycling Association to set up classes to teach young people basic bicycle maintenance and riding skills.

He is also organising the distribution of the bikes. Some of the bikes will go to an orphanage in the isolated town of Fort Portal and some will be used to provide eco-friendly cycle tours of the Kibale National Park for tourists, which the home runs to generate a profit and support the children. Other bikes will be given to young people who work on community projects.

Margaret Carey Foundation is still collecting, so if you have an old bike, please get in touch. Telephone 01535 275530.

 

Any old iron?

Bicycles  – Wheelchairs – Petrol lawnmower – Sewing machines – Garden tools – Scrap timber

Do you have any of the above that you no longer use? Let us take your unwanted items. Provided it is still in reasonable condition and that, with some TLC at one our offender refurbishment projects, it can be put back into full working order, we would like to hear from you.

Call David on 01535 275530 to arrange a collection